Not Robert Cumberford

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A failed car designer tries to make sense of a flat design world.

How Ford’s getting it right with the Fiesta launch.

Ok, I’ve been critical in this blog and on Twitter for a while now about what I perceive as Ford’s missed opportunity with the Fiesta Movement. I’ve said that they dragged their feet too long with the US-spec car and lost their momentum. I’ve said they put too much chrome on the US-spec car (I stand behind that), and I’ve said that what seemed like a brilliant and bold new-media marketing campaign might wither and die before the car had a chance to make it to market. A few things that have happened this week are starting to change my mind.

The first thing, and possibly most exciting, is that I received a call from the agency running Ford’s Fiesta Movement Part Deux telling me that my wife and I are in the running for it. I had breathlessly submitted an application about a month ago and promptly forgotten about it as everyone said that Ford was looking for younger “Agents”, so two thirty-something professionals who are about to have a baby wouldn’t really have a chance. I disagreed, and apparently so did the folks running the show, who think it could be cool. I hope so. I can only tell them that it would be an incredible opportunity to show the world that a tiny (by American standards) hatchback can make a great urban family car. I’ve been yelling it from the rooftops for years, so this would be my chance to walk the walk. The fact that both my wife and I are in design and marketing and that’s the crux of this “Movement” just adds to the excitement. Philly’s ad campaign for the Fiesta, designed by me for those people I think would love the car? Yes sir, that would be sweeter than pie.

The second thing is much less personally relevant, but something that I consider quite interesting. Amateur rally driver and DC shoes co-founder Ken “don’t call me Corky” Block and his flat-billed Monster Energy hat will be the first American ever to drive in the World Rally Championship next year, in, you guessed it, a Ford. Although he won’t won’t be driving a Fiesta in WRC (the Euro-spec Focus fills that role), he will be driving one in the X-games and, one can assume, in his next mega-viral, super-linktastic gymkhana video on YouTube (if you haven’t seen the first one, stop here, go to this link, and enjoy). Even though this development is a small one in the scheme of launching a new car, it shows me that someone at Ford might just “get” the position of the Fiesta after all. A cool hatchback that’s fun to drive and appeals to a niche segment of young urban drivers.

These two pieces of news give me hope for Ford’s small car. It might not be doomed by its own marketing, as has happened so many times before with small American cars (in a wonderfully self-fulfilling way for the manufacturers). If I get my hands on one for the next stage in the Fiesta Movement, well, I’ll be doing everything I can to make sure people know and understand, why I want this car so much and what I’ve been clamoring about for so long.

All I need now is that call back telling me we’re in. Don’t let me down Ford. I’ve been yelling for years about how the US needs good, fun, hatchbacks, please give me the forum and the megaphone to speak to a larger audience.

Category: Car design, Design, General ranting

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